HMS Racehorse Further reading

One of “The Nelson and Trafalgar Collection”.

HMS Racehorse, completed.

HM Sloop Racehorse, North Sea storm, Arctic expedition 1773“.
Subtitle “‘Put Preventer Gammoning upon the Bowsprit’, Friday 17 September.

The story of a ship, a painting, a book …

Cpt, J. Sparrow, PG & GF

To put it mildly, this is an unusual painting, this page tells you more about why and how this painting was produced and of course, something of the remarkable story of the ship.

Measuring  75 x 100 cm (29.5″ x 39″), oils, available, painted by Gordon Frickers. 

HMS Racehorse, painting bGordon Frickers, over a year in research and production.

Introducing the ship

HMS Racehorse, this ship was sometimes documented as ‘Race Horse‘.

I’m spelling as  ‘Racehorse‘ because that is the spelling used on the official drafts and recommend by historian Peter Goodwin who has written THE  book about the Royal Navy’s first scientific North polar expedition, a voyage full of surprises, of His Majesty’s Sloops Racehorse and Carcass to the Arctic circle.

Originally built at Nantes as a French privateer (Lettre de Marque).

Above water she looked much like other French sloops of the period.

Below water her lines show us she was notably finer lined than most British ships of similar size so would have been a deceptively quick sailor.

The Royal Navy used her after conversion as a ‘bomb vessel’, that is a vessel specially strengthened for the use of heavy mortar guns.

She was known to James Cook (both were present at the siege and taking of Quebec) and came to the attention of  ‘a young gentleman’ anxious to make a career and reputation in the Royal Navy, who ‘blagged’ his way onto the two ships that made up the Royal Navy’s carefully prepared first expedition into the Arctic. 

The young man in question was Horatio Nelson.

For the Arctic expedition Racehorse underwent further extensive modifications hence to the knowing eye, her unusual appearance, raised bulwarks, extended fore deck, sealed waist and so on.

A few signs of her former life remain in the painting, the offset belfry being one example.

In my painting she is shown as per her log book, with upper topmasts struck for bad weather, you may notice the main mast upper topmast and t’gallant yard have not been decked, they are lashed aloft as was common practice during squalls and minor gales.

The crew are show as they would be stationed at work, when performing the difficult task set them, putting a preventer gammoning on the bow sprit.

The painting is resplendent with other fine details which I invite you to explore and enjoy.

The two ships, intended to work as a pair, were tasked with numerous roles including measuring gravity, searching for North East Passage to the Pacific Ocean and measuring the magnetic pole’s relationship to true North.

Long after her voyage of discovery, Racehorse was recaptured by the French but so damaged in the fight as to be of no further service.

You can discover her story in full in Mr. Goodwin’s book “Nelson’s Arctic Voyage’.

To acquire this or commission a similar painting, a pleasure to own, a sound investment, you can purchase in easy stages.

To make a purchase the easiest way is bank to bank, ask for details, or using PayPal via the Purchase Page.

Contact US 

T:+ 44 (0)1865 52 2435  or Skype ‘gordonfrickers’

 whatsapp, or phone M: + 33 (0)6 10 66 19 26

E:

~ Important ! please substitute ‘@’ for ‘at’: artistfrickersatgmail.com

 

If you are looking for the best in marine art, a pleasure to see on your wall, impressive, a timeless subject, a sound investment,  you have found it here.

Racehorse early concept sketches 31.03.2017

The charm of this page, includes it offers you insights into how this painting, to date my most viewed on Facebook and being called a masterpiece, was created, a better understanding and naturally, temptation for you, an opportunity to buy this splendid painting.

At the stage shown here, many details remain outstanding.

HM Sloop Racehorse, nearing completion, January 12, 2018

The most noticeable being the foremast has no shrouds (yet) and the ship has no anchors.

I am very fortunate to have worked with  Peter Goodwin, ex Royal Navy, when he was Keeper and Curator of HMS Victory.

He did a simply amazing job (very regrettably now largely ruined by the insensitive present keepers) returning her to ‘Nelsonian’ condition prior to the 200 th anniversary of Trafalgar.

Incidentally Mr. Goodwin is a seriously qualified naval engineer, one of the foremost authorities on Georgian and other wooden ships and to date author of 17 published books on ships.

I first met Mr. Goodwin when I was appointed ‘Official Artist’ to HMS Victory; we became colleagues and gradually, firm friends.

On HMS Victory with Peter Goodwin

I was privileged to consult with Mr. Goodwin about many details where exact information is obscure thus we have here a painting particularly rich and true to form.

Available, Contact Us

T: + 44 (0)1865 52 2435  Mobile 00 33 (0) 6 10 66 19 26

or Skype ‘gordonfrickers’

E: artistfrickers at gmail.com

A general introduction

During the 18 th century at sea lives, technologies, were changing, not as fast as today, certainly, inexorably, changing.

Today some of us think far to many people judge past times by today’s standards and ideals, which muddies their ‘liberal’ thinking.

This painting is intended to offset that, to ‘tell it like it was’.

The Royal Navy often accused of being all “rum, sodomy and the lash”,  then as now was in the forefront of those change. 
I think it’s worth keeping in mind, much of our planet was unknown to Europeans (and Americans) at that epoch, the 18 th century. 
The Royal Navy launched a series of expeditions to discover, scientific voyages. 
The most famous by far being those of  Captain James Cook who made three sensational voyages of discovery and pioneering sciences, plus Cook  lost no men to scurvy which begs many a question why? 

For that matter, Sir Francis Drake‘s voyage was not plagued by disease unlike many later voyages like that of George Anson‘s squadron (1740 /44) which lost about 3,000 men and 8 ships mostly to diseases. 

Racehorse sailed for the Arctic in company with HMS Carcass, both ships very specially prepared,  they sailed very much in the tradition of discovery, in the spirit of Francis Drake and the Elizabethan ‘Sea Dogs’ who while often misnamed pirates, among other things discovered the passage past Cape Horn, still marked on charts as ‘Drake’s Passage’ and Drake looked North for a ‘North West Passage’.

You probably know, at that period a North West and or a North East Passage looked an attractive possibility, so the question was, did those Passages exist?

No one knew for certain. 

The two ships Carcass and Racehorse that carried the young Horatio Nelson were specially prepared for the voyage. 
Both were former ‘bomb vessels’ further adapted and strengthened. 

A ‘bomb vessel’ was a type adapted to carry very large mortars as opposed to the usual canons and cannonades.

Their rigs were distinctive, their hulls heavily reinforced to withstand the colossal recoil of the large mortars.

The Royal Navy made good use on many occasions of these unwieldy craft.

Racehorse was for example present and active at the taking of Quebec.
Many other modifications and innovations were prepared including ‘Arctic’ clothing, a type good enough to still be in use over 100 years later by “Scott of the Antarctic”.

Peter Goodwin had all the above very much in mind while writing “Nelson’s Arctic Voyage“. 
As a former submariner (with the benefit of not being an officer) who has sailed square rig and was keeper of HMS Victory, he is very aware of the hardships faced by seamen, so you will find his books entertaining as well as factual and the man himself a great authority to talk with. 

Racehorse, detail 09.03.18

My painting is in part intended to illustrate the hardship and danger faced daily and taken as normal on little ships like HMS Racehorse.
You might like to keep a look out for Peter Goodwin’s new book, due to be published 2018.

This painting is taken directly from the log book of HMS Racehorse, we have the date, day and time of day and the exact North Sea location.
I am helped by among other things, having sailing on what was at the time the world’s oldest sailing square rigger, an 1858 Spanish built brig “Maria Asumpta” on the North Sea

Brush with history

and crewing time on more ‘modern’ square riggers.. 
Peter Goodwin also made available contemporary pictures and the draft plans of ‘Racehorse‘. 
In addition we had many lengthy conversations and I do mean lengthy, about the scene and life at that period. 
We also consulted several captains who know well the North Sea

One of our consultants was Captain Frank Scott, a retired square rig master and grandson of the famous “Scott of the Antarctic”. 
The book “Nelson’s Arctic Voyage” is full of surprises and helps one understand the context of this classic painting.

Art Insight: 

working notes about this painting:

How Racehorse was painted
 
My aim is to encourage viewers to use their imagination, to feel and sense the scene rather than have every dot on place, every ‘t’ neatly crossed.
The trick is to blend that with technical and historical accuracy without paying out to little or to much cable.
Can I achieve that?
I try.

This page is at present in part a collection of half edited notes, we hope that will give you further ‘feel’ for this artwork, that you can enjoy it enjoy for what it is.

Return to main page

The following relatively brief list is from pages in a notebook written while in conversation with Mr. Peter Goodwin, you can almost ‘taste the salt air’.

Part of the charm is expressed in the obvious care and passion for fine detail and atmosphere.

Thus one begins to appreciate why the M D of Rochay Elite said at the private viewing of “The Nelson and Trafalgar Collection” at the Trafalgar Soiree (Army & Navy Club, St James, Pall Mall, London) “The new Turner“,  “one of the new masters of the 21st century“…

Racehorse progress, detail 08.11.17

Working Notes: 

The painting began with a phone call which lead to a meeting and my producing the first ‘concept sketches.

Racehorse sketches (2) 31.03.2017

Simple studies exploring, for discussion,  how the painting might eventually look.

HMS Racehorse, preparatory sketch

Sketches made in discussion with Mr P. Goodwin, supervised by ‘Jack’, or as he is more formally know, Captain Jack Sparrow.

Cpt, J. Sparrow, PG & GF

Racehorse sketch 31.03.2017

Racehorse sketch 3 31.03.17

Most of these concept sketches were rejected however each expressed a possible idea, our quest was for what we thought would best express the hardships faced by the crew as they straggled with the dangerous but vital task laconically noted in the ship’s log book as “Put Preventer Gammoning upon the Bowsprit”.

Exploring Racehorse sketches 31.03.2017

Having settled on a design, the next stage was to mark that out on a canvas and begin to establish atmosphere with tonal values.

Racehorse 01.08.17

Flipping ship !

Racehorse 07.08.17

A new problem had been quickly revealed, the light source and run of sea where wrong,  therefore challenging me to take the brave decision to scrap the work and over paint having in effect ‘flipped’ the ship.

Racehorse 09.08.17

Gradually, patiently, our ship begins to reveal herself. 

Racehorse progress 27.09.17

I already had a very strong ‘vision’ in my mind for this painting, however paintings take of a sort of life of their own, they ‘speak’ to me as they develop, sometimes demanding, sometimes surprising me with happy accidents. 

Racehorse, detail, progress 27.09.17

Details show signs of emerging from the mists of the paint, in this case we catch sight for the first time of a Swedish Brig we know Racehorse ahd spoken with a hour or so earlier.

Racehorse, detail, progress 27.09.17

By this time Peter has decided it’s fun working on the painting with me and has suggested a booklet on the story of the Racehorse painting.

Racehorse, detail, progress 27.09.17

The ship’s hull is much changed, the basic shape is near correct, many other changes.

Racehorse progress 06.10.17 

By this point the painting is beginning to ‘come together’, at last it looks as if there may yet be a good painting some where waiting to be revealed by this canvas.

Here, Peter is pushing me hard, no bad thing, we had another hour plus conversation yesterday by phone , mostly about the steering and anchoring equipment used by Racehorse.

Racehorse progress 14.10.17

For me part of the challenge was could I still paint as well as I did when I produced the famous “Roaring Forties” which 

Roaring Forties

had been reproduced in dozens of journals world wide as diverse as The Times of London, Reader’s Digest and Lloyds List as was later, “I Have Urgent Dispatches“,

Signale der Seefahrt

a star several books and to date used in two TV programmes… ?

Racehorse progress detail 2 14.10.17

Slowly, impatiently, as I got myself deeper into a mess, the painting began to look to have ‘possibilities’.

Racehorse progress, detail 30.10.17

Very nice of them, the ship’s crew begin to organise themselves for me, each man to show he is at a task that would have been allotted during this most difficult and dangerous modification to the rig.

Racehorse progress, detail 08.11.17

If the preventer gammoning had not been fitted, there was a real danger that Racehorse would loose her masts.

Therefore that task was the first I focused on and we particularly wished to present to you.

Racehorse 98 % complete, detail 17.11.17

Her rigging had been stretched by weeks of constant, severe gales she and her people had endured as they struggled to return from the Arctic to England.

Racehorse, detail, note the crewman aloft clearing a jammed block… and the tattered commission pendant denoting she is a Royal Navy ship.

HM Sloop Racehorse, North Sea Storm, Arctic Expedition 1773

Always best to finish a painting in it’s frame.

Hyperlink > Nelson & Trafalgar Collection, “HMS Racehorse”, available.

At this stage, 95 % completed, there are still many minor details I wish to give further attention and naturally, as the colours dry, so the painting will further change appearance.

Racehorse, detail 09.03.18

97 % completed, I’m now looking to ‘fine tune’ details, Mr. Good wind was very demanding and a huge help with technical details, very understanding when I explained how they would be adjusted as would tints as colours settle.

In both instances I was surprised and duly educated.

In the process, not really relevant but one never knows where a conversation with Peter may lead, Peter described how he fired cannons and from aloft a musket (he owns one). Peter is often surprising, willing to be unconventional and immensely knowledgeable, I feel privileged to work with a great authority, Peter Goodwin.

In turn Peter has said he is very pleased with the way our experiences overlap, generating a rather special painting.

 

Working notes made with the full and generous co operation of Mr. P. Goodwin.

With author Peter Goodwin

With author Peter Goodwin

“At this stage the preventer gammoning is being added, to follow, man working other side, three turns in place, coil on deck, his arm over bowsprit.

Mast colours, varnished

Fish davit, add span shackle to deck f’ard of Belfery, block to be same size as davit.

Add main topmast stays’l and rigging.

Add steering sail irons to tops’l spares, ditto lower yards plus varnished booms.

Commission pennant, tied to pt side shroud, 15 ‘, frayed end.

Man aloft on d shrouds, fore topmast, checking topsail lifts, check where block hanging from cross trees.

Cross trees slightly larger.

Sharpen up topmast capping (square shapes.

Show two anchors pt side

Add spritsail yard (37’ 1 1/2 “) & rigging, sail harbour stowed.

Double size of speaking trumpet.

Tackle for mainstay for boats made good on a ringbolt midships.

One crew member with Black face, representing Gustav Weston, man with rope on fore deck

St’bd inboard bulwarks dull red not blue.

Cat head double block with a tight line on hook securing it to a knight head or shroud.

Chimney? Maybe if it shows, a stump, sealed.

Add reef tackle pennants for topsails

Add Fore mast shrouds, backstays, braces, tacks and sheets, etc

Add topping lift for gaff”.

09.11.2017, Insight some observations, direct from notes written to Mr. P. Goodwin, creating a classic marine painting.

There is now a mate near the two helmsmen.

I found and have fitted the binnacle, it’s a very tiny detail aft the Mizzen mast, for’ard of the wheel.

Olaudah Equiano / Gustav Weston is included on the foredeck as one of the men abaft the mast. I’m thinking of moving him to a more prominent position so it’s more obvious a ‘black’ face is present.

Belfry added,

 

Working Notes

Outstanding: 01.11.2017

Main yard studding sail booms. None shown on the illustrations I have; however one does look to have the outer irons fitted.

If you wish me to add the booms, do you recommend they would have been varnished?

anchors: Broken anchor stock, you mentioned this so I’ve not yet included anchors. Should I show 1 or two anchors pt side?

Foremast shrouds and all mast backstays

Braces ~ these have me a bit perplexed. Main yard no problem, the others… The arrangement for topsails and fore coarse are not as per the 1859 brig I sailed on. So far I’ve not found a satisfactory illustration in Lee’s book or others for a small ship circa 1773.

Intended, more attention to the Swedish brig and a bit more to the sea.

Commission pennant, as a warship, would she have been flying one in the circumstances we are showing?

 

Racehorse progress, 30.10.17

Racehorse progress, 30.10.17

Painting By Gordon Frickers, a marine art,  75 x 100 cm (29.5″ x 39″), Oils, available.

As I write today 01.11.2017, so far, no one has seen the actual painting here except me.

This makes me nervous.

I find myself quite surprise my Nelson and Trafalgar paintings continue to attract attention.

I’m now more aware, the public interest in Nelson and Trafalgar, their fame will echo down history for at least as long and there is a western civilisation.

Apparently my authoritative ‘Nelson and Trafalgar Collection’ has become a widely admired, significant part of that story.

Nor until recently did I fully appreciate how my very varied experiences and connections have combined to give this and the other paintings in this series an unsurpassed aura.

My experiences as a youth with some of the very last British sailors to trade by sail without engines and many others combined to prepare me in a most extraordinary way for my task as Official Artist to HMS Victory in preparation for the 200 th anniversary for Trafalgar.

Upon that event I visiting many places and archives in England, France and Spain, carrying a magic letter of introduction from HMS Victory‘s then commander Mike Cheshire, thank you Mike for sharing our vision.

Many people very willingly assisted my research, some sadly are no longer with us; it was an unrepeatable period, just as I now realise how special and unrepeatable those paintings really are. “The Nelson and Trafalgar Collection” to which HMS Racehorse is being added.

Contact Us

T: + 44 (0)1865 52 2435  Mobile 00 33 (0) 6 10 66 19 26

or Skype ‘gordonfrickers’

Email: artistfrickers at gmail.com

Acquire, simply, securely; to place a deposit or payment on our Payment page  to make this or a similar painting, yours …

 

This painting is conceived as closely as possible, from the ship’s log book, mid to late afternoon, 17 th September 1777.

Return to main page

This painting is available, Contact Us

T: + 44 (0)1865 52 2435  Mobile 00 33 (0) 6 10 66 19 26

or Skype ‘gordonfrickers’

Email: artistfrickers at gmail.com

 Simply, securely;  to place a deposit or payment on our Payment page  to make this or a similar painting, your Gordon Frickers original painting (or acquire subject to availability, a beautiful Heritage quality print)?

 

Racehorse, detail, progress 27.09.17

Racehorse, detail, progress 27.09.17

Report for the day 27.09.2017:
 
 
Racehorse sketch 3 31.03.17

Racehorse sketch 3 31.03.17 ~ this sketch has been sold.

I am willing to release sketches like this one for as little as £100. if I’m assure they will go to a good home.

Racehorse‘, a new painting in conjunction with Peter Goodwin ex R N, who previously in his distinguished career, was “Keeper and Curator of HMS Victory for 14 years, was a technical adviser for the film “Master & Commander“, is author of some 17 ‘naval books’, a most excellent thorough researcher and all round good win value.

To acquire or commission a similar painting

Contact Us

T: + 44 (0)1865 52 2435  Mobile 00 33 (0) 6 10 66 19 26

or Skype ‘gordonfrickers’

Email: artistfrickers at gmail.com

 

HMS Racehorse, preparatory sketch

HMS Racehorse, preparatory sketch

In both instances I was surprised and duly educated.

In the process not really relevant but fun and one never knows where it will lead, Peter described how he fired cannons and from aloft and a musket (he owns one). Peter is often surprising, willing to be unconventional and immensely knowledgeable, I feel privileged to work with a great authority, Peter Goodwin.

In turn Peter has said he is very pleased with the way our experiences overlap, generating a rather special painting.

Racehorse Sketch 11.06.17 IMG_0331

Racehorse Sketch 11.06.17 IMG_0331

Following his invitation to visit and stay at his home in Portsmouth, author Peter Goodwin and I worked together to develop his ideas for the new painting.

I’d prepared some concept sketches, possibilities explore, from which we developed a drawing which would form the basis of the new painting.

Peter Goodwin, Captain Jack Sparrow and Gordon Frickers...

Peter Goodwin, Captain Jack Sparrow and Gordon Frickers…

Return to main page

Racehorse 01.08.17

Racehorse 01.08.17

Dated 10.09.2017, this follows a lengthy discussion with author and historic ships authority Peter Goodwin and a good few hours solid effort on my part.

With Peter Goodwin and Captain Jack Sparrow

With Peter Goodwin and Captain Jack Sparrow

 

 08.08.2017 ~ Big change to the composition:
The major change to composition was decided for several reasons.
To show her starboard side meant the sail would mask most of her decks thus hiding what would be interesting accurate details and by showing her port side we are looking from the East by North East to the South West so the lighting and colours offer me more possibilities.

Today I’ll refine ‘Racehorse‘ and begin to sort out her masts, spars and sails, all info from the log book and the combined sea & ship building experience of Peter Goodwin and I.

Racehorse 09.08.17

Racehorse 09.08.17

Racehorse progress 27.09.17

Racehorse progress 27.09.17

Today, 08.08.2017,  I’ll refine ‘Racehorse‘ and begin to sort out her masts, spars and sails, all info from the log book and the combined sea & ship building experience of Peter Goodwin and I.

The Swedish brig on the horizon, we know Racehorse spoke with a Swedish brig earlier that day, we even know where she was bound and her course steered.

Here she looks unrecognisable when close up.

Yet mysteriously, when seen from normal viewing distance looks very much like a distant brig in turbulent weather.

At this stage I am now fairly happy with the basic dimensions of the hull, spars and sails.
I’ve had to alter the mast rakes, they were raked to far aft.
In turn that meant altering all the yards and sails except the stays’l.
The mast and spar dimensions Peter Goodwin sent were very helpful for improving the scale and perspective.

Her sails included a main trysail, standing jib, middle jib.

She set a bowsprit, job boom and outer jib boom, the latter was routinely derigged for heavy weather.

Source, ship’s log, 25 October 1773

Possibly the most obvious change is the jib boom (37 ‘) now notably shorter in the painting; easy to lengthen if we think longer looks better.

I noticed shorter was appropriate when checking the spar dimensions ~ and it does fit in well with Peter Goodwin mentioning to me the record shows she has a flying jib boom to further extend the rig in lighter airs;  which would have been struck inboard before a storm.
I wonder where it was stowed and if it survived the deluge that smashed most of the boats…
I expect to make further refinement.
Usually as I begin to add more detail I work out from the centre.
That way errors reveal themselves naturally and are easy to correct.
I have made a number of changes to the sky but left is basically as was.
It had been my intention to work over the entire sky however, visitors during August were so enthusiastic about the sky I’ve left it as is for now.
My intention is to suggest the main light source is on our left, much modified by the storm.
As Peter Goodwin agreed, to avoid making the scene to scary for landlubbers, I’m aiming to show the weather clearing.
As mentioned, I had in mind a sky similar to “I Have Urgent Dispatches” however given the different location, month and sea state, our sky has taken on a very different appearance to “I Have Urgent Dispatches”, very much its own creature.
I suppose, being a submariner Peter Goodwin didn’t see much of the sea and sky… trust me, I have.
The Swedish brig looks unrecognisable when close up and yet mysteriously, when seen from normal viewing distance looks very much like a distant brig in turbulent weather.
I hope you like that?

I do.

Racehorse, detail, progress 27.09.17

Racehorse, detail, progress 27.09.17

One of the things I try to achieve is a strong sense of emotion,  and as we know, in reality there is a difference between what we see, what we feel and what we know is there.
I see that as a trap and an opportunity.
What I do not want to do is so over detail my paintings that they become the sort of picture that used to be so fashionable on chocolate boxes.
An illusion of detail, yes, always a puzzle too, mysteries that you are invited to ponder, which like good poetry, mean different things to each individual.
My aim is to encourage viewers to use their imagination, to feel and sense the scene rather than have every dot on place, every ‘t’ neatly crossed.
The trick is to blend that with technical and historical accuracy without paying out to little or to much cable.
Can I achieve that?
I try.
There is still a lot I wish to do to the sea besides the obvious colouring and texture.

I’ve been using a knife for the sea in the foreground and plan to phase the paint textures towards the horizon so that should make a pleasing contrast with the sky.

At this point I made what felt like a hard decision, for several reasons, to reverse the composition, undoing and covering much of the previous work.

Good news includes the first indications of the cross sea are appearing, the main swell being from the West, with a confused NW topping, and Racehorse is beginning to look as if she is afloat in her element.
There is rather a lot of wet paint so over the next few days I’ll only work on parts easily accessible, the bow area for one.
I’ll check up on the crew, make sure they are where we want them and doing the tasks we have allotted them.
We will also have to make a decision re the surviving boats, where were they most likely lashed in the waist.

I guess those that survived were the least exposed when the seas climbed on board?

Racehorse 07.08.17

Racehorse 07.08.17

Racehorse 09.08.17

Racehorse 09.08.17

 
Racehorse 10.08.17

Racehorse 10.08.17

 

Return to main page

 

HMS Racehorse, painting bGordon Frickers, if you are looking for the best in marine art, you have found it here:  75 x 100 cms (29.5″ x 39″), Oils, available.

T: + 44 (0)1865 52 2435  Mobile 00 33 (0) 6 10 66 19 26 or Skype ‘gordonfrickers’

  • If you are interested in a print of this new painting, declare your interest, it might get you a pre publication discount

Contact Us

T: + 44 (0)1865 52 2435  Mobile 00 33 (0) 6 10 66 19 26

or Skype ‘gordonfrickers’

Email: artistfrickers at gmail.com

 Simply, securely;  to place a deposit or payment on our Payment page  to make this or a similar painting, your Gordon Frickers original painting (or acquire subject to availability, a beautiful Heritage quality print)?

Copyright 2017:

Copyright fees and our Terms are among the most generous on the Internet, don’t hesitate to ask for details  

T:+ 44 (0)1865 52 2435 

Email: artistfrickers at gmail.com,

Skype (gordonfrickers)

whatsapp, or phone M: + 33 (0)6 10 66 19 26

Gordon Frickers 08,08,2017 © updated 11.10.2017, 01.11.2017, 09.11.2017, 12.11.2017, 17.11.2017, 12.01.2018, 09.03.2018, 14.03.2018, 20.05.2018 

Gordon Frickers, the only artist member of British Marine

Gordon Frickers, the only artist member of British Marine

Be Sociable, Share!